IELTS Speaking Part 3 Guide and Tips

The IELTS Speaking Part 3 or Task 3 is called Two-Way Discussion’ and takes about 4 to 5 minutes. This part of the test will have questions about the overall topic you have discussed in Part 2. You will expand the topic more deeply and abstractly while showing the examiner that you can articulate and defend your thoughts in greater depth.

Part 3 or Task 3 of the IELTS Speaking test is what most candidates dread in this section of the test. Why? It is because the most difficult questions are thrown in this part of the test; questions that require critical thinking that might throw you off guard if you are not ready. 

Organizing your thoughts and structuring your sentences in English is difficult enough. How much more if you will be asked about topics that you do not have any idea of? 

This article will help you prepare for the IELTS Speaking Part 3 and everything you need to know to get a high band score is here.

What are the Steps in IELTS Speaking Section Part 3?

The IELTS Speaking Part 3 assesses how well you can express abstract ideas compared to the personal topics you discussed in Part 1 and Part 2 of the IELTS Speaking test.  

In this part, the examiner will speak with you longer and the two of you will have a two-way discussion, hence the name. The examiner may ask you to justify your opinions that will require more skills in English to answer. 

  1. The examiner will ask you a series of questions (around 4-6 questions) related to the topics you have discussed in Part 1 and Part 2.
  2. You need to answer the questions that will be thrown at you, in greater depth and understanding.
  3. If you need clarification regarding the questions, you may ask the examiner to repeat or rephrase the questions. 

What is the Evaluation Criteria for IELTS Speaking Task 3

Just like the other two parts of the IELTS Speaking test, Part 3 will also have the following criteria:

  • Pronunciation:
    • Weightage: 25 %
    • What is being evaluated? They are evaluating how natural you sound when you speak.
  • Lexical Resource:
    • Weightage: 25%
    • What is being evalated? They want to find out how excellent and appropriate your vocabulary is.
  • Fluency and Coherence:
    • Weightage: 25%
    • What is being evalutaed? They want to find out how organized and clear your speech is.
  • Grammatical Range and Accuracy:
    • Weightage: 25%
    • What is being evaluated? They are trying to determine how good and accurate your grammar is. 
Evaluation CriteriaWeightageEvaluation of
Pronunciation25%How natural do you sound when you speak?
Lexical Resource25%How excellent and appropriate is your vocabulary?
Fluency and Coherence25%How organized and clear is your speech?
Grammatical Range and Accuracy25%How good and accurate is your grammar? 

How to Ace IELTS Speaking Part 3?

The IELTS Speaking Part 3 can either make or break your band score. This is the most critical part of the IELTS Speaking test and, if you do not fare well in the first and second parts, this is where you can make up for it. However, messing this part up will significantly affect your overall IELTS band score, no matter how excellent you perform in the first and second parts. 

We are here to help you perform at your best, and we have listed the different useful phrases and structures of sentences that you can employ to ace the IELTS exam and achieve a high band score. Make sure to use the following tools or methods when answering the question:

  • Expressing opinions
  • Speculating and expressing possibilities
  • Agreeing or disagreeing
  • Comparing and contrasting
  • Clarifying questions
  • Transitiong words

1. Expressing Opinions 

You will be asked what you think and how you feel about a certain topic. Make it a point that you justify your reasons, and you cite examples. 

Examples of expressing opinions:

  • What I’m trying to say is…
  • As far as I am concerned… 
  • I would like to point out that… 
  • From my perspective/point of view…
  • Well, I think/believe/suppose/reckon…
  • I think most people would agree that…

2. Speculating and Expressing Possibilities 

You will be asked to picture a different situation than the one you are in or talk about the future and weigh possibilities. Speculating can help you offer a more detailed response even if you have little information or strong feelings on the issue.

Examples of expressing possibilities:

  • It is likely that…
  • It is probable that…
  • It seems to me that… 
  • I would assume that… 
  • The chances are that…
  • There is a chance that…

3. Agreeing or Disagreeing

You will be asked for your thoughts and given the option of agreeing or disagreeing. This is an excellent chance to demonstrate your conversational skills in defending your reasons. 

Examples or agreeing/disagreeing: 

  • I beg to differ…
  • I see your point, but…
  • That’s not always true…
  • You are absolutely right…
  • That’s exactly how I feel…
  • I couldn’t agree with you more…

4. Comparing and Contrasting

You will be asked questions that require you to compare and contrast experiences, people, places, or things. Knowing how to use comparable structures effectively is essential for this. If you are comfortable with this language and want to go further, use adverbs to add depth to your descriptions.

Examples of comparing & contrasting:

  • Whereas…
  • Likewise…
  • Just like…
  • Similar to…
  • In contrast to…
  • As opposed to…

5. Clarifying the Questions 

If you do not understand the examiner’s questions, and you need the sentence repeated or rephrased, it is totally fine to ask for clarifications. Ensure, however, that you ask politely and not too often. 

Examples of clarifying questions:

  • I’m sorry, I didn’t get that. 
  • Could you say that again, please?
  • Would you elaborate on that, please?
  • Could you repeat the question, please?
  • Could you please explain the question to me? 
  • I’m sorry, I’m not quite sure what you meant by…

6. Transition Words 

If you want coherence, order, and connections in your speech, incorporate cohesive features or transition words. These will aid in the organization of your answers and demonstrate connections between your ideas.

Examples:

  • In fact…
  • Besides…
  • Moreover…
  • Therefore…
  • Subsequently…
  • Nevertheless…

How to Structure Your Speech or Response?

In the IELTS Speaking Part 3, how you formulate and organize your phrases is very important. Do not respond to the examiner’s questions with a single short reply. Respond in a compound and complex sentences as much as possible and demonstrate your knowledge of the examiner’s structuring of your sentences. Paraphrasing the questions will also work to your advantage in this part of the test. 

Topic/Question:

Why do some people keep switching their jobs?

Wrong Answer:

People keep changing their jobs because they want to experience a lot of things. They also want to grow further. They are also not happy at their jobs.

Correct Answer:

In my opinion, some people change from one job to another because they want to experience doing various things and in turn grow further as a person. Similarly, I think some people do realize that the job they have isn’t what makes them happy, so they look for other jobs that will give them self-fulfillment.


Topic/Question:

Is it necessary for companies to set up customer service? 

Wrong Answer:

Yes. It is necessary for companies to set up customer service. Customer service helps customers in complaining about the products and services they buy. It also helps companies to improve.

Correct Answer:

From my perspective, I believe that having customer service is beneficial to both companies and clients, so yes, companies and businesses should have customer service. Firstly, it protects the customers so that it gives them the medium to contact companies in case the products and the services they have availed aren’t good. Another reason is that it gives companies and businesses room for improvement because they will be aware of what they need to improve based on the feedback that the customers will give through customer service.


Topic/Question:

Is it important to have a hobby? 

Wrong Answer:

It is important to have a hobby. It allows us to relax during our free time. For people who are working, it gives them a break from work. It gives them something to do to spend their time wisely.

Correct Answer:

I strongly believe that having something worthwhile to do during our spare time is beneficial to our well-being. Why? Because it takes off our mind from physiological problems that we may be having. For example, to those people who are working, I would assume that they would want to take a break and do things that they find enjoyable. This way, they can relax, unwind, and re-energize so that their minds and bodies are refreshed by the time they have to go back to work.


Topic/Question:

Why do young people tend to waste money?

Wrong Answer:

Young people waste money because they did not earn it themselves. Their parents give it to them. They do not know the value of money yet. They do not know that it is difficult for their parents to earn money.

Correct Answer:

One of the reasons I believe why most young people tend to waste money is because they did not earn it themselves. Young as they are, they might not know the value of money yet, and not realize the efforts and hard work that their parents have exerted just to earn the money that is being handed to them by their parents. However, I believe that when they grow older and start working for themselves, they will realize the value of money and saving.



Tips and Tricks for IELTS Speaking Part 3

Part 3 of the IELTS Speaking test might be terrifying to most people, but if you know just what to do and what techniques to apply, it will go smoothly, and before you know it, the interview is finished. 

Here are the tips and tricks that will surely help you give your best performance in the IELTS Speaking Part 3. 

  • Expand your answers: The IELTS Speaking Part 3 allows you to go deeper into the subject. It is your chance to express what and how you feel about a certain topic. You must try to go as far as you can with your responses. This will also give the examiner enough basis on what marks to give you.
  • Answer all the questions: Some candidates reply with “I don’t know” and lose focus when asked about a topic they have little knowledge of. Always answer the questions, and if you are unsure about a topic, buy yourself some time by saying something like, “I haven’t really thought about that before…. but in my view……” and then giving your opinion. However, you should not do this for every question; instead, save it for those you are at a loss for what to answer first. You should give it your all if you want to get a high band score.
  • Give a direct answer to the questions: Do not beat around the bush. Just like in the IELTS Speaking Part 1, answer the questions directly on your first statement. Giving irrelevant responses will make the examiner think you either do not understand the question or do not know the given topics, which will affect your marks. 
  • Use a wider range of grammar and vocabulary: Grammar and vocabulary constitute 50% of your Speaking test band score. If you can keep talking about a topic, it means you have a wider range of vocabulary and understand the grammatical structures required to express yourself. This is exactly what the examiner is looking for and, thus, will give you a chance of scoring high in the IELTS Speaking test

Bonus Tips for IELTS Speaking Test Part 3:

  • Expand your answers.
  • Paraphrase the questions.
  • Cite examples and personal experiences.
  • Use transition words and adaptable phrases.
  • Employ a wide range of grammar and vocabulary.
  •  Answer in compound and complex sentences.
  • Answer the questions directly in your first sentence.
  • Stick to the point and do not include unrelated topics.

What are Some Common Topics in IELTS Speaking Part 3?

Unlike the first and second parts of the IELTS Speaking test, the third part includes topics not about you anymore. Questions and topics in this part of the test focus mainly on general and abstract ideas. You will need to evaluate, speculate, and justify your ideas and opinions. 

Here are the most common topics that have appeared in the IELTS Speaking Part 3 in recent years:

Topic:

Internet

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Do most people in your country use the internet?
  • How has the internet changed the way we work?
  • How different would the world be if the internet did not exist?
  • Do you believe that all information on the internet is accurate?
  • Where can individuals go on the internet to find credible information?

Topic:

Work

Potential questions in the topic:

  • What has changed as a result of technological advancements in the workplace?
  • Which jobs do you think contribute the most to society?
  • What skills do you believe are necessary to obtain a decent job nowadays?
  • Do you believe women should be able to perform the majority of men’s jobs?
  • Do you believe that when it comes to choosing a job, happiness is more essential than salary?

Topic:

Food

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Do you think diet is important?
  • What for you is a balanced diet?
  • Why do you think some people enjoy eating out? 
  • How has the food preference of people evolved in the last few decades? 
  • What is the difference between a restaurant food and home-cooked food? 

Topic:

Love and Marriage

Potential questions in the topic:

  • What do you think makes a happy marriage?
  • What do you think is the best age to get married?
  • Does getting married mean giving up your freedom?
  • Do you think that after getting married, people change?
  • What are some advantages of international marriage? 

Topic:

Animals and Pets

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Why do some people keep pets?
  • Why do some people not eat meat?
  • What can children learn by having a pet? 
  • Do you think there are advantages of keeping pets?
  • Is it morally upright to spend a lot of money on pets when there are people who are starving? 

Topic:

Weather and Climate 

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Do you think weather affects people’s mood?
  • What can we do to stop the greenhouse effect?
  • How do you think the climate has changed in recent years?
  • How do you think weather and climate affect the lifestyle of people? 
  • How does climate change affect the environment and people in general?

Topic:

Shopping

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Do you think discounted items have a good value?
  • What has changed about shopping in the last few decades?
  • What are the benefits and drawbacks of shopping online?
  • Do you believe that online shopping will eventually replace shopping in reality?
  • Why do you think some people like shopping in street markets more than in actual stores? 

Topic:

Culture

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Do you believe it is essential to know about other cultures??
  • What do you think is the most effective way to learn about other cultures?
  • How can we benefit from learning about other cultures?
  • How important is it for you to know about other cultures?
  • Do you think learning foreign languages can help us understand other cultures? 

Topic:

Education

Potential questions in the topic:

  • How important is education for you?
  • Do you think teachers are paid enough?
  • Do you think education will determine our future?
  • Do you think it is easier to learn as a kid than an adult? 
  • Should the government allot more budget on education?

Topic:

Free Time and Hobbies

Potential questions in the topic:

  • In your country, how do people spend their free time?
  • Is it important to have a hobby? 
  • Is it harmful to spend too much time on a hobby?
  • Do men and women spend their free time differently? How?
  • How do people’s financial capabilities affect the way they spend their free time?

Topic:

Friends

Potential questions in the topic:

  • What makes a good friend?
  • Is having a lot of friends a good thing? 
  • Why is it hard to maintain friendships? 
  • Why do you think it is easier to make friends on the internet than in reality?
  • Do you think it is good to borrow money from a friend? Why or why not? 

Topic:

Travel and Holidays

Potential questions in the topic:

  •  Do you think tourism will harm the planet?
  • Do you think there should be additional public holidays?
  • How do you think traveling will change in the future?
  • How has traveling changed in the last few decades?
  • Do you think modern life gives people more time for leisure? 

Topic:

Life Experience

Potential questions in the topic:

  • What experience do you wish you would gain? 
  • Do you think we learn best from our mistakes?
  • What is the most efficient approach to accumulate life experience?
  • Is it more necessary to have experience or to have potential?
  • Can we gain life experience from books and movies?  

Topic:

Leadership and Politics

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Can leadership be taught?
  • What should a leader do to maintain their popularity?
  • What is it about elected officials that makes them so unpopular?
  • Do you believe that leaders are born?
  • Do you believe it’s a good idea to have unelected heads of state?

Topic:

Role Models

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Do you think it is important to have a role model?
  • Who is responsible for influencing the conduct of young people?
  • What type of people influence the young in your country?
  • What do you think will have the largest impact on young people in the future?
  • Do you believe your country’s educational system has an impact on young people’s behavior?

Topic:

Parents and Children

Potential questions in the topic:

  • What effect do parents have on their children?
  • Do you believe it is okay to breastfeed in public?
  • Should a good mother leave her career to raise her children at home?
  • Do you believe that parents should be able to have a kid at a certain age?
  • What are some of the most difficult issues that parents confront, in your opinion?

Topic:

Fashion and Clothes

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Will how we dress have an impact on how we act?
  • What do you believe our clothes convey about us?
  • Do you think that the way people act depends on what they are wearing?
  • How different are your current clothes from ones you wore ten years ago?
  • Why are some people so concerned about keeping up with the latest fashion trends?

Topic:

News and Magazines

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Is it exciting to work as a journalist?
  • Will newspapers be phased out in the near future?
  • How different would the world be if the news did not exist?
  • Do you believe it is necessary to stay up with current events?
  • Why do some journalists go to the front lines of a war to report on it?

Topic:

Films and Movie

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Do you think people’s tastes in TV dramas will change as they become older?
  • What effect does a foreign show have on people in your country?
  • Should movies and TV shows be restricted, or should we be able to pick what we watch?
  • Do you believe that the popularity of movies has increased or diminished in recent years?
  • What are the benefits and drawbacks of making films based on true events?

Topic:

Decisions

Potential questions in the topic:

  • Do you find decision-making easy?
  • What is the most significant factor in making a decision?
  • Do you believe that adults make better decisions than children all the time?
  • Do you think decision-making is a skill that everyone should develop?
  • Is it appropriate for parents to make decisions for their children?


How to Improve Your Performance in IELTS Speaking Task 3?

The DOs

  • Be confident:  Confidently express your ideas. You can still achieve a high band score even if you are unsure whether your ideas are good enough. The examiner is more concerned with your pronunciation and fluency. 
  • Listen carefully: Pay attention to the questions that the examiner asks you and consider their structure. Are they asking for your opinion? Are they asking you to describe the evolution of something from the past to the present? Or are they asking you to compare one thing with another? The keyword is always to listen carefully. 
  • Think before answering the questions: You may need some time to consider the question before responding. It is OK to request a few seconds to gather your thoughts. You have this time to come up with a response. Prepare to give a confident speech by figuring out how to connect your ideas.
  • Know that the examiner is trying to make you dig deeper: The IELTS Speaking Part 3 is the examiner’s opportunity to truly put you to the test and push your language abilities to their limits. Keep in mind that they will ask you questions that you will not be able to answer adequately.  They will frequently increase the complexity of the question until you are unable to respond. They are not attempting to be harsh; this is simply the most effective approach for them to assess your grammatical and vocabulary understanding. If you know this will happen, you will not be as anxious, and you will be able to respond to the questions more confidently, resulting in higher band scores.

The DON’Ts

  • Don’t overdo it:  If you want to amaze the examiner and use a fancy word, make sure you understand what it means; otherwise, you risk losing points. You are more likely to use a word you are unfamiliar with in an improper context if you use it. It will be inappropriate, and the examiner will penalize you. As a result, speaking in words that you are familiar with and use frequently is preferable.
  • Don’t lose focus: On the day of the test, stay calm and do not lose focus. The IELTS Speaking Part 3 will put you to the test even more than the first and second parts in terms of your ability to communicate in English. The questions are harder, and depending on the topic, you can learn something new. They will ask you questions to test your abilities and assess how well you can respond, exhibiting your command of grammatical structures and vocabulary.
  • Don’t hesitate to ask questions: If a question is not clear to you, ask the examiner to repeat it for you. It is preferable to know exactly what you are being asked from the start rather than avoid it and deliver an irrelevant response. If something is not clear, do not be afraid to ask. You will not be deducted marks for it. 
  • Don’t finish your answers too quickly: Take your time while answering the questions and respond to them to the best of your ability. Give your opinion, explain why you believe it, and back it up with relevant instances. If you remember to do that, your replies should extend and demonstrate your abilities to the examiner.If you respond fast, the examiner will continue to ask you questions, gradually increasing the difficulty of the questions as the examination progresses. Take your time and thoroughly respond to the questions to demonstrate your command of the English language. 

How to Prepare for IELTS Speaking Test Part 3?

The questions that will be asked in IELTS Speaking Part 3 are indeed challenging and will require both your English-Speaking skills and critical thinking skills to work simultaneously. It might not seem easy, but if you prepare yourself enough before taking the test, you will do more than okay in this part of the test.

Here are the top ways to prepare for the IELTS Speaking Part 3:

  • Practice, practice, practice: Make sure you practice with the sample tests provided in the official Cambridge books and websites. It is critical to becoming familiar with tests that are from official sources. You should practice as much as possible and take as many practice tests as you can. It will aid you in familiarizing yourself with the test format and increase your confidence throughout the actual test.
  • Read, watch, and listen: Utilize all possible resources you may have that will improve your English proficiency. Read books, magazines, and newspapers. Watch movies, television shows, and documentaries too. Furthermore, listen to podcasts and radio stations. Doing these things before the test will improve your grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and fluency, all of which constitutes your marks in the IELTS Speaking test.  
  • Know the most common types of questions:  Learn about the most common types of questions that appear in the IELTS Speaking Part 3. This will assist you in determining how to respond and what to watch out for while practicing. At the same time, this will familiarize you with the structures of questions that the examiner will ask. The most common types of questions in the IELTS Speaking Part 3 will require you to:
    • Express opinions 
    • Assess and evaluate
    • Compare and contrast
    • Explain causes and effects
    • Speculate and express possibilities 
  • Have a speaking partner or a private tutor: If you know a friend who is a native speaker, seek their help to practice and converse with you in English. You could each take turns in being the interviewer and the examiner. On the other hand, if you do not have a native-speaker friend, you could engage a private tutor. It is preferable that you hire a tutor that can teach you on online platforms such as Skype and Google Hangouts. This way, you may ask a question whenever you want and get an immediate response.

For a thorough and comprehensive guide on how to prepare for the entire IELTS test, check out our comprehensive IELTS preparation guide.


Sample IELTS Speaking Part 3 Questions and Model Answers

While preparing for the IELTS Speaking Part 3, we strongly advise that you read and go over the different questions and model answers taken from this part of the test. This will give you an idea of what strategies to utilize to make you more confident on the day of the test. 

Below are some sample IELTS Speaking Part 3 questions and model answers to help you prepare for the test.

Topic: Internet

Question 1:

“Do most people in your country use the internet?”

Response:

“I would have to say yes, almost everyone I know has access to the internet. In my family alone, we all use it for both professional and personal reasons, and I think I speak for most people. The internet is something that most people everywhere use nowadays.” 

Question 2:

“How has the internet changed the way we work?”

Response:

“In my opinion, the internet has dramatically changed the way we work. These days, a large number of people work from home. As someone who is also working from home at the moment, I find it really convenient because I can do other chores while working at the same time. The internet has also made it possible for us to work anywhere and anytime we want to. Furthermore, it has created a lot of job opportunities for everyone, and this is all because of the widespread acceptance of this technology.”

Question 3:

“How different would the world be if the internet did not exist?”

Response:

“From my perspective, I believe that the world wouldn’t be what it is today without the internet. And to be honest, I myself couldn’t imagine the possibility of not having the internet. From the moment I wake up in the morning, the first thing I do is check my emails, and it’s made possible because of the internet. I think that without the internet, everything would be inconvenient. Come to think of it, and if the internet never existed, we would have to resort to snail mail which takes days and sometimes weeks to reach the receiver. The internet has majorly changed every aspect of our lives, and it’s going to be a 180-degree turn if the internet never existed.”

Question 4:

“Do you believe that all information on the internet is accurate?”

Response:

“Well, I don’t think so. I believe that not everything we read on the web is accurate. There might be thousands or even millions of pieces of information there that are misleading and false. A lot of people have access to the internet, and they can publish anything they want to even if these things have no basis, and this is where being responsible for what we post on the internet comes in. At the same time, we as readers should also research if what we read are indeed facts.”

Question 5:

“What problems does the Internet create?”

Response:

“In as much as I would like to convince myself that the internet is a good thing and it does not pose any threat to anyone, I do believe that the internet causes some problems too. If you read the news, more and more people are becoming victims of cyberbullying, which causes them stress and depression to the point that some even commit suicide. Another problem that I think is rampant nowadays is internet addiction, especially among the millennials to the point that it has affected their work and studies.”


Topic: Free Time and Hobbies 

Question 1:

“In your country, how do people spend their free time?”

Response:

“Well, I believe it is a matter of personal preference. Active people are more likely to hang out and spend time outside socializing with other people. They may join clubs, meet new friends, or participate in social activities. Introverts, on the other hand, introverts prefer to spend their free time staying at home and spending quality time with their families. They may read books, knit, paint, and other sorts of activities that do not require mingling with lots of people.”

Question 2:

“Is it important to have a hobby?”

Response:

“I personally believe that spending our free time doing something we find enjoyable and relaxing is good. It helps us combat stress and fatigue. I myself can attest to this. I am a factory worker, and there are times when I have to work for 18 hours straight, so on my off days, I would go fishing with my friends. It’s a hobby that helps divert my attention from the usual things that I do at work. Having a hobby helps people divert their mind off of work and other stressful things that they experience.”

Question 3:

“Is it harmful to spend too much time on a hobby?”

Response:

“Yes, to some extent, I agree. While having a hobby gives us time to relax and unwind after a long day at work, or school, overindulging in anything isn’t good. Many people waste too much time playing video games or attending parties without recognizing it. For example, a student who spends long hours playing video games will affect his academic performance at school. As a result, people should strike a balance between their personal lives and their hobbies or to put it simply; everything should be in moderation.” 

Question 4:


“Do men and women spend their free time differently? How?”

Response:

“I think we as individuals spend our free time differently not because of gender, but because of individual preferences. I believe that for every hobby there is, there are both men and women who do it. For instance, one might think that playing basketball is only for men, but I do have friends whose hobby is playing basketball. The same is true for crocheting; though it might seem like something only women do, I’m pretty sure some men find it enjoyable.”

Question 5:

“How do people’s financial capabilities affect the way they spend their free time?”

Response:

“Finance, in my opinion, is the primary factor that affects one’s choice of hobbies. While well-off people like to spend their time playing golf or relaxing at spas, folks who do not earn that much prefer to stay at home and watch movies. It is true that the more money we have, the more money we spend, which is why our leisure activities differ depending on how much money we make.”


Topic: Decisions

Question 1:

“Do you find decision-making easy?”

Response:

“Actually, I think I am an indecisive person who finds it difficult to make decisions. I’m prone to overthinking outcomes and eventually hesitating as a result. What I do is I make a list of pros and cons to assist me in making a decision and to ensure that I’m making the right decision.”

Question 2:

“What is the most significant factor in making a decision?”

Response:

“For me, the first thing that I take into consideration when I am making a decision is the long-term effect it would have not just on me, but for the people around me as well. I believe that thinking about how other people will affect your decision is important because, at the end of the day, we should not be selfish when we make decisions.”

Question 3:

Do you believe that adults make better decisions than children all the time?”

Response:

“That’s how it should be, right? Adults should be making better decisions than children because they have had more experience in life. However, in my opinion, that is not what is happening all the time. I think that at some point, there have been adults who have failed in making the right decisions, as there have been children who, surprisingly, have made the right call. That being said, I believe that making the right decisions does not have something to do with our age.”

Question 4:

“Do you think decision-making is a skill that everyone should develop?”

Response:

“Absolutely. It is, in my opinion, one of the most important skills a person should have to be successful in life. The choices we make can have a huge impact on our own lives and the lives of those around us. Sometimes, we have to make judgments under pressure or with many other factors to consider, and if we do not make the right call, we will suffer tremendously. Therefore, being able to make smart decisions is indeed beneficial.”

Question 5:

“Is it appropriate for parents to make decisions for their children?”

Response:

“Absolutely not! I think that if parents are concerned with the well-being of their children, they will let their children make decisions and learn from it themselves. As humans, I strongly believe that we learn best from our mistakes. Children should be able to make the decisions for themselves because it will make them more responsible and accountable for their actions. Parents should be there to guide and assist their children, but they should let their children decide for themselves.”


Topic: Culture

Question 1:

“Do you think it is important to know about other cultures?”

Response:

“I believe that learning about other cultures is extremely important. Not only will we learn interesting things, but it will also make it easier for us to interact with people from all over the world if we know about their culture. I believe that it is beneficial to be knowledgeable about the world, and we should not isolate ourselves within our own country only.”

Question 2:

“What do you think is the most effective way to learn about other cultures?”

Response:

“Personally, I think the best way to learn about a culture is to visit it and immerse yourself in it. It will be much simpler to pick up things if you can get a feel for the culture directly, but I also believe that reading books on various cultures may teach you a lot about them. Reading about other people’s travels throughout the world is the next best thing to actually being there.”

Question 3:

How can we benefit from learning about other cultures?”

Response:

“People can benefit from different cultures in a variety of ways, including business, personal relationships, and self-improvement. In business, it’s important to have a basic understanding of the culture with whom you’ll be working. Tipping, for example, is something that Japanese and South Koreans find offensive. If you were unaware of this, it could hurt your business opportunities. It’s also necessary to just develop yourself by knowing as much as possible, and culture is a good subject to start with.”

Question 4:

“Do you think learning foreign languages can help us understand other cultures?”

Response:

“Not necessarily. However, most places where you can learn a language will also help you learn about the culture, so in a way, yes. I think that language isn’t a way to understand culture on its own, and if you want to learn about a culture, you must learn more than just the language because when we say culture, it’s more than that. It refers to almost every aspect of how a particular group of people live.”

Question 5:

“How important is it for you to know about other cultures?”

Response:

“I strongly believe that in today’s globalized world, learning about other people’s cultures is crucial. Whether in business, travel, or work, cultural awareness is necessary. We can better interact with others if we are familiar with their culture. Learning about the cultures of someone from another country at one’s work, for example, will lead to better relationships. I believe that in general, if we are aware of the culture of other people, this will make our lives and work better.”



Additional FAQs on IELTS Speaking Section Part 3

What is Part 3 in IELTS Speaking?

The IELTS Speaking Part 3 is called the “two-way discussion.” From the name itself, it is a discussion between you and the examiner. The examiner will ask you questions related to the topics discussed in Part 1 and Part 2. However, the questions in this part of the test are more challenging and complex as they will require both your critical thinking skills and English-speaking skills to work simultaneously.

How Can I Prepare for IELTS Speaking Part 3?

You can prepare for the IELTS Speaking Part 3 by practicing at least 6 to 8 weeks before your actual test. You can do this by using English in your daily conversations with your family, friends, and workmates. Another way to prepare for this part of the test is to watch movies and documentaries, read books and magazines, and listen to podcasts and radio stations. These will help you improve your grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and fluency, which are the criteria on which your IELTS Speaking test will be marked.

How Can I Crack IELTS Speaking 3?

The best way to crack the IELTS Speaking Part 3 is to practice. You never were too confident when it comes to your English-speaking abilities. IELTS is a standardized test, and it is designed in a way that will push your English skills to the limits. Practice right away the moment you register for the test, and by the time you have to take the test, you will be ready and prepared.
You can practice for the IELTS Speaking Part 3 by familiarizing yourself with how the test works and the different topics this part will cover. Reading samples and model answers will surely give you an advantage too.

How Long Should I Speak in IELTS Speaking Part 3?

There is no specific length of time required to speak in the IELTS Speaking Part 3. However, it is recommended that you do not give either too short or too long answers. As long as you answer the questions and the supporting statements you provide relevant to the topic, you can speak and express your ideas. Do not include off-topic statements to make your responses, as this will affect your band score.

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